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20121031
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CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 10:00pm EDT
for more information on this and other cities visited a ibook to these local content vehicle go to c-span.org/local content. >> coming up, booktv% after words an hour-long program where we invite guest host to interview authors. this week, legal journalist john jenkins and his in his book, "the partistan" the life of william rehnquist. in it the publisher "cq" press details the early career and a 33 year supreme court tenure of the former chief justice. he talks with supreme court reporter and the biographer for justices o'connor and scalia, joan biskupic. >> host: welcome john jenkins. we are here to talk about your new book, "the partistan" the life of william rehnquist. i want to start with one general question to give our viewers a sense of who the chief justices and we william rehnquist was important. there've only been 17 chiefs, correct? tell us a little bit about the position. what's what's is the chief justice of the united states do in the importance of william rehnquist and then we will go into the chronology. yes go the chief has two roles in the judicial system. he is first the chief a
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 11:00am EDT
has been late to accept them. and once local scientists sort of rediscovered the use of experiments to go out in the real world and test techniques and campaigns on voters, they sort of naturally went to basically want to be oversize textbooks and said what of the things people using to motivate individuals to recycle or to buy certain products? change their investing habits, and that's if we translate these things to voting for registering. so there still is i think a lot of stuff that's been demonstrated in realms other than politics of having a sort of psychological mechanism that people work in politics think can be translated into come into political behavior. and so it's almost all the motivation, not isolation. but i think there's probably going to be far more that comes out of that world that changes the language and texture a lot of the political teen occasion that we have. >> host: do you think most of this right now is more weighted towards motivating people to vote, is that what you're saying? and less really figure out the sides between the persuasion? >> guest: part of
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2012 9:00pm EDT
to become a nurse and the nature of the local hospital the would be a government program i would get behind. i like the government. >> host: i think that is grotesque and billing for the men but i admire your willingness to follow these ideas for the conclusion we are probably not going to do that because this probably wouldn't accept it and one hopes they have not dignity and respect. >> guest: i agree with that. there is no debate about that because that is the way if you are living on -- why is that that the grandson's of rich people are not always but generally an impressive? this is a phenomenon that you noticed? the trend line on this is -- >> guest: it is a sense of entitlement, we started the conversation. our men inherently flexible, no, you surely know lots of men who are very flexible. they have been flexible. why are all the men in your book such couch potatoes? you look at this moment in history and there is a little bit of wretchedness and if the men would leave things the would be fine and would be better to admit that the neat things and in terms of the generations spawn of
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2012 10:00pm EDT
? which in some local society we still do. i don't think there's anything inherent in that. >> host: are you talking about the weekends or after where? a man who is a stay-at-home father. >> guest: or you just pass that guy in the park. you think we will never get to that point. >> host: i'm not even at catching a value to it. i'm merely noting this liberal world where people think we are entitled to a single happy marriage in which a man is a stay at home dad and his wife is the breadwinner. >> guest: those that have not chosen to be stay-at-home dads probably. >> host: men's understanding of themselves is bound in intrinsically what they do for living in that rose out of their nature. i'm not endorsing that. i'm just quoting the reality of it. i'm just not aware and i know a number of people who have been in that position of a single happy stable marriage where the man stays at home but maybe there are a lot of them. >> guest: that's interesting. let's explore that for a minute. is an important question. increasingly women's identity are tied up to their work in a way which we may
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 9:00pm EDT
local communications we have. >> host: do think most of it is motivating people to vote and less figuring out the science but in the persuasion? >> guest: people design these experiments as the easiest thing to measure is whether or not somebody voted because you have the board of elections month after and to update the fodor file and it's, you know, it is yes or no. persuasion civilized of pulling people before and after to see if they change their mind. you have to rely on them being honest in their sort of self reporting of their choices, and so the other reasons a lot of the people who started doing this work in academia were it made it very difficult to do. persuasion in the campaign but if you are doing the non-specific test you can spend the diversity dollars so there's a big body of work on the science and a lot of that informed by the sword of behavioral psychology. there's far less new science of persuasion. one thing i've written about this year is how the obama campaign is adopting these experimental methods to measure the effect of their mail and online ads and tv ad
CSPAN
Oct 22, 2012 12:00am EDT
to go to community college to be a nurse with a job at the local hospital, i'd get behind that government program. i like the government. >> host: grow -- grow terrific to the growth of men. >> guest: why? >> host: men wouldn't accept it. one hopes they have enough self-respect and dignity -- >> guest: god, i so disagree with that. >> host: there's no debate about it because that's how men's minds work. if you live -- why is it that the grandsons of rich people are nots always, but generally, unimpressive and drunk? this is not a phenomena. you've noticed. >> guest: what do we have to expect from mitt romney, all the handsome sons wouldn't produce good spawn? >> host: they might, but -- >> guest: it's a sense of entitlement. >> host: exactly. >> guest: people ask me, are men inherently inflexible? no. you know men who are flexible, have been flexible. why are in the men in the books couch potatoes? look at the moment in history, and there is a little bit of rigidness, and if men would need things, that would be fine, that would be better to admit they need things, and in t
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 11:00am EDT
a nurse and then a job at the local hospital, that will be a government program would get beyond. >> i think that would be a grotesque and belittling think. i admire your willingness to follow these ideas through to the logical conclusion. we're probably not going to do that because men probably would not accepted. one hopes it would have enough self-respect and dignity. there is really no debate about that because that is the way men's minds work. why is it that the grandson's of rich people are not always, but generally an impressive? this is not a phenomenon you have noticed? >> what to we have to respect for mitt romney? all those handsome sons are not going to produce any could spawn? >> they might. they absolutely might, but the trend line is negative, as you know. >> because it is a sense of entitlement. how we serve this devastation. people ask me, and nearly inflexible. well, no. you know lots of men who are flexible. they have been flexible. why are all the men in your book such cut potatoes? you look at this moment in history, and they're is a little bit of region this. mene
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7